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Getting Kids Back to School Routine

Aug 31 2017 | Maple Crest

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As the summer comes to close and school is getting back into in session, here are a couple quick reminders to help make the transition from the home to the classroom easier for you and your child.

Anticipate and address your child’s anxiety - Going back to school is stressful for kids of all ages, so head off the stress before school even starts. Talk to your child and let them know that his nervous or apprehensive feelings about the start of school are normal. All kids (and adults!) have a hard time getting back into the routine of the school year. The knowledge that he is not alone in this experience will help your child feel he’s being heard and understood.

Ease back into scheduled days - When your kids are used to running around outside until dark each night, shifting to the early morning school bus rush can be a real shock to the system. To ease the transition, about a week before the first day of school, start their bedtime routine about 10 minutes earlier each night and wake them up 10 minutes earlier each morning, every day until they’re back on track.



Set up a comfortable place to study - Another transition that can be rough after a summer break is homework completion. Your child should have a clean, well lit, comfortable space for homework. Make sure they have the supplies they need at hand so they don't waste time searching for a ruler, highlighter or another item. Of course, some children have active schedules, with team sports, music classes, or afterschool clubs, which can make engaging in homework more difficult. Letting your child know that you understand the hard work he is putting in and being ready with frequent positive feedback for his effort can help motivate him to get homework done.

Seek out one-on-one time with your child every day – You might be shuffling one kid to one activity and picking up other kid from another. Challenge yourself to set aside just 15 minutes per day, per child, to enjoy a quiet activity together. Whether it involves reading a few extra books to your toddler, taking turns making up a story with your preschooler, or gazing at the stars with your oldest after the others have been put to bed, your children will savor your undivided attention. And both of you will benefit from putting yet another hectic day on hold.